What will messaging be like in the future?

Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s Founder and CEO, recently offered an exciting hint about what future messaging technology will look and feel like. He declared that telepathy will be the future of Facebook. Zuckerberg explained during a Q&A:

“We’ll have the power to share our full sensory and emotional experience with people whenever we’d like…we’ll be able to send full rich thoughts to each other directly using technology. You’ll just be able to think of something and your friends will immediately be able to experience it too if you’d like.”

Zuckerberg envisions virtual reality predominating and paving the way for digital telepathic communication. (Click here for the entire Q&A transcript on Facebook.)

If Zuckerberg’s dramatic declaration is even remotely close to the truth, then there are some intriguing questions to discuss in preparation for this technological advance.

How can we prepare society for telepathic messaging in the not-so-distant future? Click To Tweet

A Mental File for Envisioning Telepathic Messaging

Can you imagine transmitting your thoughts and feelings without typing words and your friends will sense what you’ve been through? Your opinions? Random Reactions? Pain? Pleasure? Passion?

I can’t wrap my head around what telepathic messaging will be like. I just can’t. It’s so far from my everyday experience. I keep thinking of Sookie from True Blood and how tortured she was by her unavoidable ability to hear peoples’ thoughts.

I have so many questions about what telepathic messaging would be like? Click here to see my first effort to compile what I consider to be some of the more intriguing and important questions to begin asking about telepathic messaging.

Imagine actually feeling along with your Facebook friends the ups and downs of their day, the mental images they concoct, and the random ideas that can be sensed and understood, but not put into words so easily.

Catching the Speed of Technological Evolution

Is telepathic messaging really possible?

I think so. What evidence leads me to this conclusion?

According to TheEmergingFuture.com, in 20 years we will be one million times more advanced in our understanding of technology than we are now. (See this fascinating estimate of exponential growth charted here.)

The limits of our digital world keep getting redefined and we kind of have no choice but to sit back and see where the evolution takes us.

We are chasing a constant renewal of what is considered the latest technology. Click To Tweet

Technological advances are certainly developing at an exponential rate (to say the least) as confirmed by an MIT study, which affirmed that “the rates of improvement will increase exponentially over time. The actual rate of improvement — the exponent in the equation — varies depending on the technology.”

A year ago, TechRadar.com interviewed Jonathan MacDonald, a researcher of technology’s societal and business influence, who stated:
“Exponential growth indicates that by 2030 the average size of a computer chip will be the size of a blood cell and around one billion times more capable than today. Due to this, it isn’t too far fetched to imagine the ability to communicate via emotion without an intermediary device. It is highly likely that much of the communication machinery will live under our skin. Literally.”

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see how fast information technology is developing, but besides Mark Zuckerberg, who knows where it’s headed?

We witness this rapid evolution as consumers who buy new gadgets that become obsolete before we get a chance to bask in the glory of owning the latest greatest.

All we know is that no one truly knows what messaging will feel and look like beyond the immediate future of wearable devices and augmented reality.

The Techealthiest Approach to Preparing for an Exciting Future

One of our guiding principles at Techealthiest.com is that predictive discussions about how our digital lifestyles might be challenged in the future will help us prepare for mind-bending technological advances.

It all starts with asking the right (and wrong) questions. Just an open discussion about what might be is crucial to our ability to successfully welcome and integrate technologies that are 15 years or more away from now.

So let’s leapfrog over the topics of augmented reality and wearable technology to ponder what a future lifestyle of daily, telepathic messaging could be like. I can’t wait to hear what you think…